Trees

Uprooted, Part Three: Brain Reacts

Uprooted, Part Three: Brain Reacts

In Part One of this four-part blog series, I wrote about how curiously shaken I felt by a recent wind storm that uprooted and snapped trees across Northern New England and left behind a historic power outage. In Part Two, I looked to Mother Nature and a book by forester Peter Wohlleben for answers and found common sense explanations as to how and why the fallen trees were so vulnerable to the wind.

That helped me understand their vulnerability, but it didn’t help explain my heightened sense of vulnerability.

Uprooted, Part Two: Trees Respond

Uprooted, Part Two: Trees Respond

In Part One of this three-part blog series, I wrote about the wind that blew through Northern New England two nights before Halloween, and how uneasy I felt seeing what I thought were strong trees ripped out of the ground or snapped like twigs. I wondered how this autumn storm could have resulted in a historic power outage in the State of Maine, surpassing even the often cited “Ice Storm of ’98.” I also wondered why seeing the landscape littered with downed trees made me question my own landscape of security so suddenly.  

Why were the trees more vulnerable than I thought?

A two-pronged investigation - in the field and in the “classroom” - offered some answers.