Nature

Uprooted, Part Four: A Different Storm

Uprooted, Part Four: A Different Storm

Seeing a giant maple tree I’d known my whole life snap and fall in the wind storm rattled me. I didn’t think it make sense that something that big and strong could go down so suddenly. My unease was compounded by learning that hundreds of thousands of trees were down and that power outages had surpassed Maine’s historic Ice Storm of ’98. 

What I thought about in Part Two is that wind and trees have been dealing with each other for millions of years; well before humans got in the middle with telephone poles, wire lines, and “property”. Thinking about this wind storm in the context of trees’ 370 million years of existence and survival on the planet made me more objective. Nature has a tidying process. I might have over-reacted in Part One by describing the uprooted trees in my backyard as “crime scenes”. 

Even with perspective and power restored, I still had a lingering sense of vulnerability triggered by the events of this storm.

Uprooted, Part One: Thoughts after a storm

Uprooted, Part One: Thoughts after a storm

“Vulnerability is the underlying, ever present and abiding undercurrent of our natural state.” - David Whyte

I didn’t hear the trees falling during the night because the winds were too loud. 

In the morning I wondered how I could have missed the sounds of them being beat up: pushed over, snapped, cracked or downed. 

I walked around and saw trees on the ground, roots ripped out and exposed. 

It made me want to cover them up or look away.