Maine

Uprooted, Part Two: Trees Respond

Uprooted, Part Two: Trees Respond

In Part One of this three-part blog series, I wrote about the wind that blew through Northern New England two nights before Halloween, and how uneasy I felt seeing what I thought were strong trees ripped out of the ground or snapped like twigs. I wondered how this autumn storm could have resulted in a historic power outage in the State of Maine, surpassing even the often cited “Ice Storm of ’98.” I also wondered why seeing the landscape littered with downed trees made me question my own landscape of security so suddenly.  

Why were the trees more vulnerable than I thought?

A two-pronged investigation - in the field and in the “classroom” - offered some answers.

Uprooted, Part One: Thoughts after a storm

Uprooted, Part One: Thoughts after a storm

“Vulnerability is the underlying, ever present and abiding undercurrent of our natural state.” - David Whyte

I didn’t hear the trees falling during the night because the winds were too loud. 

In the morning I wondered how I could have missed the sounds of them being beat up: pushed over, snapped, cracked or downed. 

I walked around and saw trees on the ground, roots ripped out and exposed. 

It made me want to cover them up or look away.